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Posts Tagged ‘Press Release’

Yesterday I got a bunch of press kits from a new customer. This is not some inexperienced, “just out of school” musician trying to build a career, but a well seasoned composer with a reasonably well regarded name and reputation in a particular niche of classical music circles. Let’s say he is no Daniel Barenboim in the “fame meter” but he is certainly not an unknown interpreter. So, I was quite shocked with what I saw: badly written releases, a default Word document lay out… you get the idea. The Spanish version of the kit was full of typos, to the point that in one page, they had misspelled the composer’s name (and this was written by his agent, who is a native Spanish speaker). The English one appeared to have been translated by Borat.

I weeped… and then I got to search for some other Classical Music composers and interpreters so that I could send my customer some examples of what his direct competitors were doing. And then I weeped some more.

I checked the top results in Google and what I saw was not just inconsequential text. It was bland, boring and dull beyond belief. Fifteen page press kits packed with text in small fonts (warning all links go to PDF files) or an inane collection of newspaper and magazine clips. Or this other example, where the ego driven agency splashed the entire release with their logo in such prominence that I am unsure weather the soprano in question is Ana de Archuleta or the unfortunate Elizabeth Caballero.

Compare the above press materials with this, this or this, also from the top results but in the pop music category.

Classical Music institutions, programmers, and artists have to struggle with the general perception that the genre is boring, elitist and not worthy of mass consumption. I generally disagree with these statements, but obviously many marketing professionals working in the area are not helping much to dispel these myths. In these visually driven times, how you present your content has become as important as the content itself. I am afraid many cultural institutions could learn a lesson or two from pop culture.

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